There’s a lot of truth to how our own home can impact our mental well-being. A space that is cluttered and distracting makes it hard to organize our thoughts, which is why it’s so important to declutter both physically and mentally. Meditation is good for everyone. Here’s how to create a meditation space in your home.

Pick your space.

When organizing your home, you probably notice that there is an area that brings you happiness. Maybe it’s a corner of your bedroom that gets the most sunlight or the outdoor patio with views of the sunset. You just need a space that can offer a bit of privacy and that can be organized into your personal meditation space.

Declutter the area.

A nook crammed with full of storage, whether it’s fabric or Christmas decorations, is not going to be the meditation space you need. You must dedicate your chosen space and declutter as necessary. A good purge never hurt anyone and creating a meditation space can motivate a project that probably needed done anyway. You can leave shelving and a comfy chair, but if it’s not dedicated to relaxation, it needs to go.

Furnish the space.

Whether it’s a rug, pillow, or yoga mat, you want to have furnishings that encourage a calm area. Even beads are used in meditation spaces if you need a “fiddle object” that helps you stay still. The goal is to keep it minimal so that you can move and breathe freely.

Include items that speak to you.

No one said meditation had to be a silent practice or nothing but “ohm” sounds. Music, plants, or natural elements like salt lamps and essential oils are all capable of helping you feed your soul. This is your space and should be organized around your wants and needs. The goal is to keep it simple and neat.

Adjust lighting and ventilation.

A window is ideal, but not always possible. If there is no way to let some light in, grab a lamp that offers the most natural lighting possible. The fresh air and lighting will offer you a renewed perspective and you’ll have the energy to tackle any other organization projects ahead of you.

It doesn’t have to be private.

Your meditation area should speak to you. It could be a quiet corner, if you don’t have an entire room to rearrange and organize for this practice, or it could be a reclaimed room in your home where you do other things that give you pleasure, like paint or sew or craft. Regardless of how or where you organize a meditation space in your home. It’s an excuse to keep things organized in your head and your home.